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Tag: notice of sale

Can a borrower redeem their mortgage under power of sale?

The answer to this question is constantly evolving, with new and conflicting case law addressing specific facts released almost yearly.  The old adage of being able to redeem your mortgage (payout your mortgage) during a power of sale proceeding so long as the mortgagee in possession (being the seller) has not yet entered into a firm or unconditional agreement of purchase and sale with a buyer is no longer clear cut.Today the way I understand it is that there are two issues once the mortgagee in possession (being the seller/mortgage lender) enters into an agreement of purchase and sale with a potential buyer, and whether or not the borrower/mortgagor can still redeem (payout) his mortgage and keep his property:Agreement of purchase and sale has conditions that must be satisfied prior to the agreement becoming “firm”; and

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Can a lender charge a mortgage pre-payment penalty under Power of Sale proceedings or once the mortgage term has matured, regardless if it is an Open or Closed Mortgage?

Under section 17 of the Mortgages Act, and pursuant to relevant case law the answer is “Yes” the lender can.  Subject to the wording in the original mortgage commitment/agreement, you will often find that lenders will charge 3 months interest pre-payment penalty if they have to enforce the mortgage via a power of sale proceeding or if you neglected to renew the mortgage once the term has expired and have failed to pay the lender out (within the time allotted pursuant to the lender’s notice).  Also, often enough, the original mortgage commitment/agreement will have qualified wording for “Open” mortgages stipulating that so long as the borrower is not in default, the borrower will be able to pre-pay the mortgage in whole or in part without a penalty or bonus.  However, once in default, a lender can demand the penalty payment of three months’ worth of interest calculated on the then outstanding principle balance, even if your mortgage is an Open one.In relevant case law the courts have often ruled in favor of the lender on disputes over its right to charge penalties pursuant to section 17 of the Mortgages Act, where the borrower was found in default of payment of any principal or interest money. 

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Mortgage Enforcement: Issues for Discussion

IntroductionCommon issues expected to arise and confront legal counsels in mortgage enforcement practice, whether from the mortgagor’s perspective or from the lender’s perspective are under discussion here. Divided into ten sections, each of which addresses a discrete point, the purpose is to assist counsels in identifying the relevant issues, the common problems, and the usual solutions.Entitlement to 3-Months InterestAccording to Section 17(1) of the Mortgages Act:“Despite any agreement to the contrary, where default has been made in the payment of any principal money secured by a mortgage of freehold or leasehold property, the mortgagor or person entitled to make such payment may at any time, upon payment of three months interest on the principal money so in arrear, pay the same, or the mortgagor or person entitled to make such payment may give the mortgagee at least three months notice, in writing, of the intention to make such payment at a time named in the notice, and in the event of making such payment on the day so named is entitled to make the same without any further payment of interest except to the date of payment.”

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